Letters on BLUE From the GOLD Fields

95_228_1
Gold Rush miners far away from family and friends in the hills of California may have written their annual holiday letter on an illustrated lettersheet. Made of lightweight blue, white or grey paper, lettersheets sold for a modest price, were easily folded for mailing, and required only a minimum of postage. Each featured a space for a letter and … Continue reading Letters on BLUE From the GOLD Fields

Nothing rhymes with orange

LS_14164
What better way to celebrate my favorite tint? Then to show off Autry collections– just for a stint. As illustrated in the most obvious of examples to date, crate labels from citrus companies claiming to be first-​rate. From Southwest To-​Day, an illustration of how canines rule. Yes, you see that right, it’s a pup on a mule! More … Continue reading Nothing rhymes with orange

Maude’s Adventures Through Canyon del Muerto, Part 2

“Frederic Hamer Maude Lectures: Canyon de Chelly,” manuscript written by Frederic H. Maude, undated, Braun Research Library, Autry Museum of the American West; MS.255.
“Frederic Hamer Maude Lectures: Canyon de Chelly,” manuscript written by Frederic H. Maude, undated, Braun Research Library, Autry Museum of the American West; MS.255.
In part 1 of this series, we looked at the history behind Canyon del Muerto, or Canyon of the Dead, as seen through the eyes of Frederic Hamer Maude. We saw images from Maude’s collection of Canyon de Chelly on lantern slides that were colored during the development process. Now, let’s take a look at the words … Continue reading Maude’s Adventures Through Canyon del Muerto, Part 2

Will Levington Comfort, Apache Manuscript and Book: Searching in One’s Own Backyard

90_243_16439
Sometimes cataloging is just about the content of the book, the inside: Who wrote it, what is it about, how many pages long is it? When the book in hand has a striking illustrated cover as well, a cataloger strives to highlight that aspect, describing the image and researching the illustrating artist. Sometimes, the artist is credited … Continue reading Will Levington Comfort, Apache Manuscript and Book: Searching in One’s Own Backyard

Maude’s Adventures Through Canyon del Muerto, Part 1

"Looking Down Canyon Del Muerto from Mummy Cave," Lantern slide by F.H. Maude, undated, Braun Research Library Collection, Autry National Center; LS.10072
"Looking Down Canyon Del Muerto from Mummy Cave," Lantern slide by F.H. Maude, undated, Braun Research Library Collection, Autry National Center; LS.10072
Frederic Hamer Maude was a commercial and landscape photographer based in Los Angeles. Between 1909 and 1960 he traveled throughout California, the Southwest, and the northwest. From his travels he produced a series of illustrated travel lectures. We'll explore these locales along with Maude, starting off with this two part blog post series featuring Canyon del Muerto.

Charles Lummis and the Land of Sunshine

books
The Land of Sunshine is a bimonthly illustrated journal which Lummis later renamed Out West. He used this publication as a platform for the organizations that he founded. He also encouraged writers, artists, and musicians and was first to publish women authors in the magazines under their own names rather than under pseudonyms. Lummis was the editor … Continue reading Charles Lummis and the Land of Sunshine

The Story of the Forgotten Ones

Credit: Tamar Lando
Credit: Tamar Lando
Though we are beyond the days of nineteenth-​century cowboy icons, a few remote parts of the Southwest continue to carry traces of this rugged and solitary way of life. Director Tamar Lando set out to create a window into this aspect of American culture in her upcoming documentary film, Our Mother the Mountain. “I wanted people to feel viscerally … Continue reading The Story of the Forgotten Ones

The Ruskin Art Club & the Creation of the Hector Alliot Memorial Library

Bookplate for the Hector Alliot Memorial Library of Archaeology, Hector and Laurena Alliot Manuscript Collection, Braun Research Library Collection, Autry National Center; MS.216
Bookplate for the Hector Alliot Memorial Library of Archaeology, Hector and Laurena Alliot Manuscript Collection, Braun Research Library Collection, Autry National Center; MS.216
Founded in 1888, the Ruskin Art Club was the first women’s club established in Los Angeles. Although early members were prominent society women, they eschewed the notion of forming a social club and, instead, sought to devote their energies to rigorous art historical studies and, ultimately, the creation of a new cultural landscape in the Southern California region.